29 Sep 11 T.F. Green Airport In Rhode Island Gets FAA Grant For Runway Improvements

"The FAA has approved an AIP grant for Theodore Francis Green State Airport (KPVD) in Providence, RI. The airport's master plan calls for the lengthening of its main runway, and safety improvements to be made to the crosswind runway.
image: faa
image: faa

image: faa
Rhode Island Airport Commission president Kevin Dillon told the Providence Journal that he expects the $165 million project to break ground in the spring of 2013. "This is a great day for the airport," he told the paper. Airport officials have pursued the improvements for more than a decade. When completed, the longer main runway will allow aircraft to depart with heavier loads of fuel, passengers, or cargo. It also makes it so that airlines will not have to re-route passengers to other airports because of weather conditions."
FMI: Aero-News Net


Fly Smart,
Kent

19 Sep 11 Solar Runway Guard Lights enhance Runway Safety

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image: arc

image: arc
Aviation Renewables is pleased to deliver the Solar Series Runway Guard Light to an airport in the United Kingdom. After proving its operational capability at Southampton Airport, the Solar Series Runway Guard light is now being adopted by other airports in the United Kingdom, as part of their mandate to reduce environmental footprint. Aviation Renewables’ partner, Systems Interface, has been instrumental in the adoption of the technology. The Solar Series Runway Guard Light will increase the safety of runway intersections by providing a 24/7 visible warning that will reduce the risk of runway incursions. The Northern Model has been specifically designed for challenging solar conditions, as are found in the UK and other high-latitude locations. For more information on Aviation Renewables, Solar Series and Systems Interface, please visit www.aviationrenewables.com or http://www.systemsinterfaceltd.com

Taxi Smart!
Kent


17 Sep 11 AOPA Runway Safety: Avoid mishaps on the ground

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IMG_0217.JPG
From AOPA: Have you ever made a mistake while taxiing? If so, you’re hardly alone. Getting to and from the runway sounds simple, but there’s plenty that can go wrong, and it’s important to stay alert and understand the rules. How well do you know runway signs and markings? Are you up to speed on the new rules for taxi clearances, or the phraseology that replaced “position and hold”? If not, be sure to take the Air Safety Institute’s revamped Runway Safety online course.
FMI: AOPA Runway Safety
Editor's Note: The quiz is fun and fast and there is a great link at the end that will send your completion information directly to the Wings program! Great job AOPA!

Fly Smart,
Kent



16 Sep 11 EAA and NTSB study amateur-built plane crashes

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image: Kent Lewis

image: Kent Lewis
OSHKOSH — The Experimental Aircraft Association is working with federal safety officials to better understand crashes happening among amateur-built planes. A higher rate of accidents has occurred of late with amateur-built planes compared with factory-built planes. In 2009, an average of 25 amateur-built aircraft crashed for every 100,000 hours flown with seven fatalities, according to an official with the National Transportation Safety Board. That compares with an average of 12 crashes and two fatalities for factory-built planes flown for recreational or personal use. The Oshkosh-headquartered EAA, which is among the nation's largest organization of recreational fliers of both handmade and commercially-built aircraft, has partnered with the NTSB in asking fliers to fill out a 68-question online survey. Participants were asked about their pilot's license, how they learned to fly their amateur-built plane, why they built it, if the plane has been modified and other questions.
"What we're hoping to do is use the survey to understand the population of people who fly these aircraft and also of the aircraft themselves, then be able to compare those statistics to the kinds of people and aircraft that we're seeing in accidents," said Vern Ellingstad, chief technical adviser for investigation and research in the NTSB's Office of Research and Engineering.
About 33,000 amateur-built aircraft are registered with the Federal Aviation Administration.
Read the entire article: Green Bay Press

Fly Smart,
Kent


16 Sep 11 Photo Journal on Runway Safety Area Enhancements

Runway excursions are one of the leading causes of accidents around the globe, and enhanced runway safety areas help mitigate the threat. Here is a photo journal that documents one airports improvements: Lehigh Valley
The Flight Safety Foundation also has great info on runway safety.
FMI: Runway Safety Initiative

Fly Smart,
Kent

15 Sep 11 Arcata-Eureka Airport Adds Runway Safety Area (RSA)s

Extra runway length helps small regional airports attract larger jets and more passengers. But options are limited when an airport's runway ends at a cliff that drops 200 feet into the Pacific Ocean. That's the situation officials at Arcata-Eureka Airport in Humboldt County, CA, faced a few years ago. An $8.8 million FAA grant, however, helped remedy the situation by providing funds to relocate landing and departure thresholds on two runways and install an engineered material arresting system (EMAS) to help meet runway safety area (RSA) regulations.
The project, which required the airport to completely shut down for three days and turn off its instrument landing system for five weeks, also included rejuvenating all runway surfaces, relocating an existing taxiway and its associated lighting and signs, then remarking all the runways and taxiways.
Read the entire article at airportimprovement.com

Fly Smart,
Kent


01 Sep 11 FAA Updates Flight School Rules

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image: Kent Lewis

image: Kent Lewis
From AvWeb: The FAA on Wednesday published a final rule with updates to regulations that affect pilot, flight instructor, and flight-school certification. The rule allows pilot applicants to apply concurrently for a private pilot certificate and an instrument rating, and permits flight schools to apply for a combined private pilot certification and instrument rating course. The rule also allows pilot schools to offer internet-based training programs even if they don't have a physical ground-training facility and revises the definition of "complex airplane" to include airplanes with full authority digital engine control (FADEC). The proposed rule would have replaced the 10 hours of complex airplane time required for commercial pilot applicants with 10 hours of advanced instrument training, but that provision has not been adopted in the final rule.
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image: Kent Lewis

image: Kent Lewis
The FAA published the proposed changes in 2009, and received more than 400 comments. The most significant change from the original proposal relates to the proficiency checks for pilots of experimental turbojet-powered aircraft, taking into account whether or not those pilots fly with passengers. Other aspects of the rule revise the procedures for converting a foreign pilot license to a U.S. pilot certificate. The FAA said it has determined all of these changes are needed to enhance safety, respond to changes in the aviation industry, and reduce unnecessary regulatory burdens.

FMI: Federal Register

Fly Smart,
Kent