31 May 08 Grupo TACA A-320 Runway Excursion Honduras

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras -- A plane skidded off a runway killing five people and injuring 38 in Honduras on Friday.
The Salvadoran passenger plane veered onto a road and smashed into cars and a building at Tegucigalpa airport.
The TACA airlines Airbus A320, on a flight from San Salvador with 135 passengers and crew, lay broken in three parts and was spewing fuel after the accident, which happened in heavy rain and fog.
Full Article

TACA.jpg
TACA.jpg

A TACA airlines plane was attempting to land in heavy fog when it crashed at Tegucigalpa airport on Friday.
Photograph by : Orlando Sierra, Getty Images

Our next ALPA Runway Safety newsletter will focus on runway excursions. Sadly, the hazards associated with landing on contaminated runways have not been effectively mitigated by the aviation industry. If we are to take the next step towards reduction of the global mishap rate, we must study these events and gain as much knowledge from them as we can. Within the past few years we have had loss of life and property at Burbank, Midway, Toronto, Cleveland, Traverse City, Yogyakarta, to name only a few.
From the NTSB Most Wanted:
"Analysis performed by the Flight Safety Foundation has shown that runway excursions accounted for approximately 29 percent of all accidents involving turboprop and turbojet aircraft worldwide between 1995 and 2006. A runway excursion occurs when an aircraft either overruns or undershoots a runway while landing or taking off. Existing FAA regulations do not specify either the type of arrival landing distance assessment that should be performed or a safety margin that should be applied. The FAA advocates a minimum safety margin of 15 percent for arrival landing distance assessments and a 15-percent factor is included in the European Aviation Safety Agency and Joint Airworthiness Authorities operational requirements for contaminated runway landing performance. The FAA has sought voluntary operator compliance with performing landing distance assessments, and applying a 15-percent safety margin. However, runway overruns continue to occur in the United States when the flightcrews have not performed a landing distance assessment before landing on a contaminated runway."

A new culture needs to emerge that provides flightcrews with the training, technologies and accurate information needed to make valid situational assessments. Current system behavior does not support that, and we must improve system performance in this area.

Fly Smart
Kent


31 May 08 ALPA Runway Safety Newsletter #5

ALPA has just released runway safety newsletter #5. It contains the Preliminary Hazard List from the FAA Southwest Region Runway Safety Summit in April. It also has a case study from KLAX and an update on RWSL at Boston-Logan. Check it out and sign up for the free ALPA/AOPA Runway Safety online course.
external image pdf.png RS News #5.pdf
ALPA Hold Short for Safety website
Online Runway Safety course (Also = FAA Wings Credit!!)

Fly Smart
Kent


31 May 08 Runway Safety Human Factors

Here is a presentation on runway safety human factors. The ppt was prepared by members of the ALPA Runway Safety Action Team.
The RSAT is working in concert with the FAA Runway Safety Program to reduce the risk of runway incursions and excursions. Team communications are a critical component of this effort.
external image x-mspowerpoint.png ASW Runway Safety Summit 04-2008.ppt

Fly Smart
Kent


22 May 08 FlightGear Found another interesting website

”The goal of the FlightGear project is to create a sophisticated flight simulator framework for use in research or academic environments, for the development and pursuit of other interesting flight simulation ideas, and as an end-user application.”
FlightGear

Fly Smart
Kent



20 May 08 FREE Flight Safety Foundation AeroSafety World e-version

Signal Charlie is proud to bring you MORE FREE STUFF! Want to read a neutral flight safety publication? AeroSafety World is one of the best I’ve come across and now they are offering it FREE, all you have to do is sign up. Membership to FSF is costly, but here is their great magazine for free, delivered monthly to your inbox. Here’s their pitch.

“An Invitation to Subscribe to the FREE Electronic Version of AeroSafety World
Flight Safety Foundation’s monthly magazine that keeps pace with the most important safety issues and developments in aviation.
Launched in July 2006, the information is solid, thoroughly researched by a knowledgeable editorial staff and industry aviation safety experts. The design is dazzling. Until recently, available only to FSF members, the Foundation now is making the digital version of ASW available at no cost.

ASW is available for downloading via a link from the FSF Web site. By being an “e-subscriber” you no longer need to remember to check the Web site each month. You will receive an e-mail notification when ASW is posted on our web site with links to the latest issue — which usually happens before many people get their printed copy.

We are making ASW available for free because advertising helps offset some of the costs, and advertisers like to see healthy subscriber rates. Signing up for these e-mail notifications will help keep this important publication available at no cost to the entire aviation community. Your information will not be shared, you will not be spammed and you may unsubscribe at any time.

Go to the FSF E-Mail Subscription Service Form and subscribe now.”

Click here for the FREE AeroSafety World

Bottom line, if I could only get one magazine a month, it would be this one. Did we mention the FREE part? Enjoy!

Fly Smart
Kent Lewis



20 May 08 ALPA Runway Safety Newsletters 3 & 4

Here is a link to ALPA Runway Safety newsletters 3 and 4, dealing with runway safety. They are each only 4 pages long and have pictures!
ALPA Runway Risks
Fly Smart
Kent



15 May 08 Plane Lands Atop Another Plane

DENTON CO., Texas — No injuries were reported after a small plane landed on top of another single-engine plane Thursday afternoon at Northwest Regional Airport near Roanoke in southern Denton County. Piper was landing and Stinson was departing on Runway 35.
external image 52F%20RI.jpg?hl=en&gda=ifV_TjsAAADW2ZI7HhprOHjDxISNGaC0dkWSQjKmh_KOfEMBNkvtbWG1qiJ7UbTIup-M2XPURDTPBMxJCluyFeyoYjT7zOdU&gsc=JDa18hYAAAB9yq5peAUgg1yBBhKo3Bsgb4sM5LxQecB2XX9dOcthjQ
external image 52F%20RI.jpg?hl=en&gda=ifV_TjsAAADW2ZI7HhprOHjDxISNGaC0dkWSQjKmh_KOfEMBNkvtbWG1qiJ7UbTIup-M2XPURDTPBMxJCluyFeyoYjT7zOdU&gsc=JDa18hYAAAB9yq5peAUgg1yBBhKo3Bsgb4sM5LxQecB2XX9dOcthjQ

NBC 5 news additional photos
Rowdy Yates, Chief Flight Instructor at a local flight school said “Hollywood stunt flyers could not have done this if they tried.”
Keep yer head on a swivel out there. Taxiing single pilot at a non-controlled field presents many distinct challenges and requirements. Clear communications, enhanced navigation and increased surveillance are essential, in addition to preflight planning.
But hey, I’m not saying anything new, am I, because we’re all intimately familiar with AC 91-73 Part 91 and Part 135 Single-Pilot Procedures During Taxi Operations, aren’t we? If not, link included to review this 24 page document. Just took me 12 minutes to review. Take a look at it and pass it along to a friend. The life you save may be your own.
Fly (and Taxi) Smart
Kent
Check out AC 91-73A Part 91 and 135 SIngle-Pilot Procedures During Taxi Operations, also located in Files.

Note: Some reports state that the final approach path is obscured by trees. Yes there are trees south of the runway, but an appropriate glide path helps to mitigate that hazard. That hazard becomes a risk if not acknowledged or if an approach is flown below an appropriate glide path. Several commonly available airport information resources mention the trees.

Here's a link to AOPA Training and Safety page. The y have a great online course, Safety Advisor and additional info that makes a great Runway Safety Refresher. You get Wings credit for the online course!
http://www.aopa.org/training/articles/2008/080521pilots.html

Fly Smart
and Remember to Stop, Look and Listen!
Kent

May 22 Found another interesting website!
”The goal of the FlightGear project is to create a sophisticated flight simulator framework for use in research or academic environments, for the development and pursuit of other interesting flight simulation ideas, and as an end-user application.”
FlightGear
Fly Smart
Kent


May 20 FREE Flight Safety Foundation AeroSafety World e-version

Filed Under Safety Management Systems, Policy, Risk Management, Assurance, Promotion
Signal Charlie is proud to bring you MORE FREE STUFF! Want to read a neutral flight safety publication? AeroSafety World is one of the best I’ve come across and now they are offering it FREE, all you have to do is sign up. Membership to FSF is costly, but here is their great magazine for free, delivered monthly to your inbox. Here’s their pitch.
“An Invitation to Subscribe to the FREE Electronic Version of AeroSafety World
Flight Safety Foundation’s monthly magazine that keeps pace with the most important safety issues and developments in aviation.
Launched in July 2006, the information is solid, thoroughly researched by a knowledgeable editorial staff and industry aviation safety experts. The design is dazzling. Until recently, available only to FSF members, the Foundation now is making the digital version of ASW available at no cost.
ASW is available for downloading via a link from the FSF Web site. By being an “e-subscriber” you no longer need to remember to check the Web site each month. You will receive an e-mail notification when ASW is posted on our web site with links to the latest issue — which usually happens before many people get their printed copy.
We are making ASW available for free because advertising helps offset some of the costs, and advertisers like to see healthy subscriber rates. Signing up for these e-mail notifications will help keep this important publication available at no cost to the entire aviation community. Your information will not be shared, you will not be spammed and you may unsubscribe at any time.
What are you waiting for?
Go to the FSF E-Mail Subscription Service Form and subscribe now.”
Click here for the FREE AeroSafety World
Bottom line, if I could only get one magazine a month, it would be this one. Did we mention the FREE part? Enjoy!
Fly Smart
Kent Lewis


May 20 Runway Incursion at 52F
Filed Under Collision Avoidance, Runway Safety, Incursion
Had some excitement at the local uncontrolled GA field.
15 May 2008 DENTON CO., Texas — No injuries were reported after a small plane landed on top of another single-engine plane Thursday afternoon at Northwest Regional Airport near Roanoke in southern Denton County. Piper was landing and Stinson was departing on Runway 35.
external image 52F%20RI.jpg?hl=en&gda=ifV_TjsAAADW2ZI7HhprOHjDxISNGaC0dkWSQjKmh_KOfEMBNkvtbWG1qiJ7UbTIup-M2XPURDTPBMxJCluyFeyoYjT7zOdU&gsc=JDa18hYAAAB9yq5peAUgg1yBBhKo3Bsgb4sM5LxQecB2XX9dOcthjQ
NBC 5 news additional photos
Rowdy Yates, Chief Flight Instructor at a local flight school said “Hollywood stunt flyers could not have done this if they tried.”
Keep yer head on a swivel out there. Taxiing single pilot at a non-controlled field presents many distinct challenges and requirements. Clear communications, enhanced navigation and increased surveillance are essential, in addition to preflight planning.
But hey, I’m not saying anything new, am I, because we’re all intimately familiar with AC 91-73 Part 91 and Part 135 Single-Pilot Procedures During Taxi Operations, aren’t we? If not, link included to review this 24 page document. Just took me 12 minutes to review. Take a look at it and pass it along to a friend. The life you save may be your own.
Fly (and Taxi) Smart
Kent


May 20 ALPA Runway Safety Newsletters 3 & 4
Filed Under Safety Management Systems, Aviation History, Collision Avoidance, Runway Safety
Here is a link to ALPA Runway Safety newsletters 3 and 4, dealing with runway safety. They are each only 4 pages long and have pictures!
ALPA Runway Risks
Fly Smart
Kent


May 15 “Holler Back”
Filed Under Promotion
I’d like to give a “Holler Back” to Mike Collins of AOPA Flight Training magazine. In the April 2008 issue he mentioned some aviation blogs and Signal Charlie was one of them. I appreciate the recognition and the webstats showed a signinficant jump after the issue came out.
Thanks Mike and AOPA.
Fly Smart
Kent


May 12 Human Factors Associates
Filed Under Safety Management Systems, Human Factors
Just spoke to one of my profs from the Naval Postgrad School in Monterey. Dr Ciavarelli taught Aviation Psychology and founded Human Factors Associates. They are currently conducting an Organization Safety Effectiveness Survey at Quantas. Pretty exciting!
HFA
Fly Smart
Kent


May 12 Flight Cognition Laboratory

Filed Under Human Factors, Threat and Error Management, Team Resource Management, Flight Crew
If you’re looking for some really interesting research and lab studies on aviation human factors, start here. Dr Dismuke and his compadres are looking at challenging areas of abnormal and emergency situations, the VLJ industry and limits of expertise for professional aviators.
From the website:
“The Human Systems Integration Division’s Flight Cognition Laboratory, at NASA AMES Research Center, is studying the cognitive processes that underlie the performance of pilots, air traffic controllers, and other skilled professionals. This research involves a combination of well-controlled laboratory studies of basic cognitive mechanisms, theoretical modeling, flight simulation studies, field observations, and analysis of accident reports.
Current research topics include prospective memory, concurrent task management, stress, and visual search. We work closely with commercial airline training departments and try to provide a bridge between research and aviation operations, with the ultimate goal of improving aviation safety. ”
Flight Cognition Lab
Fly Smart
Kent


May 9 Delta Air Lines blog
Filed Under Aviation History, Flying Safety for Dummies
Delta Air Lines has a blog? And a pretty good one too, ranked in top 15 of corporate blogs.
Check out the new In-Flight safety video that is making the rounds on youtube and read some of the behind-the-scene stories.
Delta blog
Fly Smart
Kent


May 8 NTSB-Most Wanted

Filed Under Aviation Leadership, Team Resource Management
Went to a Helicopter Safety Forum today hosted by Flight Safety and Rotor and Wing (ding, plug bell). They had a great line up and had a chance to hear Mr Steve Chealander of the NTSB speak. He detailed the benefits of CRM in relationship to aviation safety and flight discipline. In many ways it was a discussion on leadership vs a sterile training topic. In fact, most ways.
Another topic that came up was how much work the NTSB does with a very small work force. Sometimes we take for granted the quality product that they put out and slip into a “headline” mentality. The NTSB maintains helps industry and regulators maintain an even keel and spends many hours working numerous transportation issues. I asked Mr Chealander what we could do as aviation safety professionals to help with their efforts and his reply was simple. Help with the follow up on the NTSB’s “Most Wanted” lists. These lists are items that the NTSB feels deserve the highest priority.
I heard a smart person remark recently, with regards to the safety world, that “if everything is important then nothing is important.” He meant we have to choose issues to focus on, correct, and then move along. The NTSB has made nice lists for us. Thanks!
NTSB Most Wanted
Fly Smart
Kent


May 6 LOSA and SMS
Filed Under Safety Management Systems
Line Operations Safety Audits (LOSA) are a key safety assurance component of a quality Safety Management System (SMS). Jame Klinect is continuing work of the UT Human Factors Research Project with the LOSA Collaborative. Many airlines are starting their second or third LOSA, and new companies are also joining, keeping James and his colleagues scheduled well out into next year.
If you are looking for a way to audit your operation, give James a call. He’ll be glad to explain the process.
LOSA Collaborative
LOSA Advisory Circular
Fly Smart
Kent


May 3 The Limits of Expertise
Filed Under Safety Management Systems, Human Factors, Automation Resource Management, Threat and Error Management, Spatial Disorientation, Stall and Spin Awareness
I’m reading a new book, The Limits of Expertise: Rethinking Pilot Error and the Causes of Airline Accidents (2007) This book will help build the bridge that will move us beyond the probable cause determination required for today’s mishaps. It would also be an excellent text for a mishap investigation course.
One of the case studies I found particularly interesting was on an American AIrbuss 300 that departed controlled flight. After the aircraft departed, the PFDs blanked and the pilots were left with only the standby attitude indicator for pitch and roll information. This was actually a design feature of the aircraft, as designers determined that the PFD would not provide reliable information beyond certain parameters.
So the aircraft was in state that the designer had not imagined, and that the operator had not trained the pilots to recover from. I’d chalk this one up as a system failure, which led to threats that the pilots had to “manage” (pretty sterile term for wrestling an Airbus
out of a fully developed stall).
I also recently spoke to one of the authors, Key Dismukes. His group at NASA is doing some great work in the areas of concurrent task management and prospective memory (when Key is not out flying a sailplane). These are come new areas that we need to take a look at as we tackle the system’s runway safety problems, an area where we do not
have fully independent and redundant systems safeties.
Amazon Review:
By Alan N. Hobbs
“The authors have applied insights from cognitive psychology to nineteen flight-crew-related accidents. In place of the dry narratives of accident reports, we are presented with compelling three- dimensional accounts in which pilots are routinely faced with time
pressure, the need to make judgments under uncertainty, and rare but potentially lethal system failures. In examining each accident, the authors attempt to reconstruct the mindset of the pilots, and place the actions of the crew in the context of the flow of events. In contrast to other reviews of accidents, the authors avoid the phrase “the pilots should have…”. Instead we are gently encouraged to understand how skilled and professional operators can come to make mistakes in circumstances that are unforgiving of error.
Through the lens of cognitive psychology, the aviation industry becomes a massive human performance laboratory, in which hapless operators are faced with situations and problems produced not by experimenters, but by the complexities of the system of which they are a part. The authors take pains to counter the common presumption that
catastrophic accidents must somehow result from extreme acts of villainy or incompetence. In this book, we repeatedly see how accidents often arise from combinations of everyday problems and situations.
By the end of the book, some fascinating patterns begin to emerge. A surprising number of the accidents involved apparently simple slips and lapses. Additionally, the majority of accidents occurred on approach and landing, and most of the accident flights were running late. The failure to go-around from an un-stabilized approach is a common theme in the accident scenarios.”
The Limits of Expertise
Fly Smart
Kent