31 Mar 09 Human Factors and SMS Conference Dallas TX Frontiers of Flight Museum

The day has finally arrived, it is time for our conference. We have a great group of speakers and an impressive roster of 200 attendees, a capacity crowd for the Frontiers of Flight auditorium. Why are we here?

"An interactive conference to discuss research issues, academic challenges, and system advances for human factors in the real-world of operations. The goal is to meet and share information cutting across operational domains: Part 121, 135, 141 and 91, fixed-wing and rotorcraft. Speakers will discuss operational lessons learned and research progress. Attendees will have an opportunity to discuss their concerns and needs for human factors tools and system solutions."

Tail.jpg
Tail.jpg
This is another step on the journey towards making our not only our airspace system better, but many other high reliability organizations. Many of the standards and recommended practices developed here are shared amongst other medical, military, nuclear and incident command communities. We all learn from each other and in the process save lives.

So we'll have a few fun days in Dallas and then jump back into the challenge of reducing the hazards throughout the system that cause mishaps. Keep an eye on this site for Proceedings form the conference. Have a good day and start making plans for our 2010 conference! We're accepting sponsorships now!

Fly Smart
Kent


28 Mar 09 Signal Charlie now has a custom search engine, Aviation Safety (AvSafe)

custom_search_sm.gif
custom_search_sm.gif
So you need some information on human factors, safety management systems. aircraft design or operations? Go to google and search for it, right? Well, that's a start , if you don't mind digging through 9,000,000 webpages looking for your information. And once you find it, how do you know if it is reliable? Wouldn't it be better if you had your own personal research librarian, someone who has spent years working as a professional in that field, who could recommend a select group of websites to you and help you get started?

Well you have that resource now, here on Signal Charlie, with the help of a google custom search engine I created called AvSafe (Aviation Safety). AvSafe mines data from custom sites that I have selected. Other sites are searched also, but the focus is narrowed to aviation safety websites and webpages. This will get you going, it will help you start turning data into information that you can use and synthesize. AvSafe will save you time and it is FREE!

The portal to AvSafe is on the Links Page, try it out.

Search Smart :)
Kent


20 Mar 09 ANA plane enters runway at Osaka airport without permission


JAL
JAL
Saturday 21st March, 06:27 AM JST OSAKA —
An All Nippon Airways plane departing from Osaka’s Itami airport entered a runway without an air traffic controller’s permission Friday morning, transport ministry officials said. Around the same time, a JAL Express plane arriving in the airport from Sendai was preparing to land on the same runway, the officials said.

None of the 407 passengers and crew members aboard Boeing 777 for ANA Flight 18 and the 167 aboard McDonnell Douglas MD-81 for JEX Flight 2200 were injured, the officials said. The safety commission of the Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism has sent investigators to the airport as it judged there was danger of a serious accident. The incident occurred at around 9:20 a.m. After the pilot of the JEX plane and the air traffic controller noticed the ANA plane’s
unauthorized runway entry, the controller ordered the JEX pilot to overshoot the runway.

Fly Smart
Kent


17 Mar 09 Air-Medical Flight Teams Lobby to Improve Low-Altitude Infrastructure, Protect Patients and Advance Air Ambulance Safety

by Vertical Mag 16 Mar 09: Establishing a congressional air-medical caucus, achieving greater federal funding levels to support the low-altitude infrastructure, passing proposed air-medical safety legislation, increasing air-ambulance Medicare reimbursement rates, and addressing regional disparities in access to trauma services caused by inadequate Medicaid reimbursement were some of the many issues that air-medical services leaders focused on during the Association of Air-Medical Services' Capitol Hill congressional briefings last week.
The lobbying sessions were part of the annual spring conference of the Association of Air Medical Services (AAMS), held March 11-13, at the Melrose Hotel in Washington, D.C. The conference provided the opportunity for air medical crew members to learn about the operational and legislative issues that directly affect medical transport programs nationwide, and to bring about improvements in the national legislative and regulatory arenas.
“A chief goal of AAMS' spring conference and lobby day was to educate policy and lawmakers regarding the need to direct more federal funding towards improving the low-altitude infrastructure,” said AAMS President Sandy Kinkade. “Currently, low-altitude aviators do not have access to the same supportive components that exist within the general-aviation infrastructure, which was built specifically for scheduled, commercial airlines – an omission that puts EMS helicopters in particular at a distinct disadvantage.”
Also important, Kinkade noted, is “securing federal funding for remote weather stations that would help bridge a ‘weather-reporting gap.' Such funding would be directed towards increasing the number of off-airport or small-airport automated weather stations and adding weather-reporting technology to hospital helipads.”

FMI: Verticalmag.com

These are critical components to improve the system that the HEMS community operates in. There needs to be a focused effort to advance these improvements and reduce not only the helicopter mishap rate, but the low altitude GA mishap rate as well.

Fly Smart,
Kent


14 Mar 09 Aviation Award Winners Named; Signal Charlie Creator K B Lewis Selected

KBLSC.jpg
KBLSC.jpg
LONGMONT, Colorado (12 March 2009) - In each of the past 45 years, the General Aviation Awards program and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) have recognized a small group of aviation professionals in the fields of flight instruction, aviation maintenance, avionics, and safety for their contributions to aviation, education, and flight safety.

This
awards program is a cooperative effort between the FAA and more than a dozen industry sponsors. The selection process begins with local FAA Safety Team managers at Flight Standards District Offices (FSDO) and then moves on to the eight regional FAA offices. Panels of aviation professionals from within those four fields then select national winners from the pool of regional winners.

Recipients of this year's national
awards are Alfred Joseph "Lucky" Louque of Chatfield, Texas, Aviation Maintenance Technician (AMT) of the Year; Arlynn Marine McMahon, Versailles, Kentucky, Certificated Flight Instructor (CFI) of the Year; Paul Jerome "Jerry" Stooksbury of Fort Collins, Colorado, Avionics Technician of the Year; and Kent Blair Lewis of Keller, Texas, FAA Safety Team Representative of the Year. Previously, this award was the Aviation Safety Counselor (ASC) of the Year.

The FAA administrator will present the national
awards in July during a "Theater in the Woods" program at EAA AirVenture 2009 in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. Included in the prize package for all four national winners is an all expense paid trip to Oshkosh for the recipient and a guest to attend the awards presentation and other GA Awards activities.

"These
awards highlight the important role played by these individuals in promoting aviation education and flight safety," said JoAnn Hill, General Aviation Awards Committee chairperson. "The awards program sponsors are pleased that these outstanding aviation professionals will receive the recognition they so richly deserve before their peers in Oshkosh."

I'd like to thank my family for their support, and my friends throughout industry for the opportunity to learn together and improve aerospace safety. I'd also like to congratulate the other winners from all of the Regions. We have a great team!
Thank you,
Kent



14 Mar 09 Beechcraft Pilot Proficiency Program

Bonanza
Bonanza
The Beechcraft Pilot Proficiency Program (BPPP, Inc.) offers Beechcraft-specific pilot training, The 1½–day companion program is designed to enhance the safety and enjoyment of flight for all who attend.
"The primary objective of BPPP is aviation safety. Flying is serious business. It demands skill levels that are learned with experience, over time. It requires a knowledge base that is ever-changing. You can never stop learning how to fly. And that is precisely why BPPP was established in 1983."
This is a great program that gears training towards your needs. Even if you don't fly a Beechcraft, if you have a chance to sit through a ground school, you'll learn a lot and walk away a safer pilot or mechanic.
FMI: BPPP
Fly Smart
Kent




11 Mar 09 Helicopter Safety

UH-1N_Formation
UH-1N_Formation
I started a new page to compile resources on helicopter safety. There has been a lot of activity recently with the NTSB HEMS Public Hearing in Feb, so I put together a summary of the proceedings. I also added a link to the International Helicopter Safety Team (IHST), their SMS-Toolkit and a Confined Area Landing (CAL) training ppt.

Fly Smart
Kent


07 Mar 09 Electronic Flight Bags

I came across this review for Reader Plates, an inexpensive way to keep a complete set of up to date NACO charts, and save some weight for other important things like fuel.

Reader_Plates
Reader_Plates
"Reader Plates
are downloadable FAA (NACO) Terminal Approach Procedures formatted for display on the Sony Reader PRS-505.
Now an instrument-rated private pilot can carry every approach plate for every airport in the US in a 9 ounce electronic book reader. It's inexpensive, easy to use, and will run for days on a single charge."
FMI: Reader Plates
Add a basic GPS and you can keep from getting lost, keep from running out of fuel and keep from running into things. 3 important things in my book.
As always, especially with these bells and whistles, look outside. That computer between you ears, plus your MK-1 eyeballs, are your best navigation and surveillance devices.

Fly Smart,
Kent
2009 National FAASTeam Rep of the Year


03 Mar 09 Piece of Aviation History for March 3 from IFALPA

Boeing
Boeing
1919 - William Boeing (1881-1956) and Edward Hubbard (1889-1928) deliver the first bag of international U.S. Air Mail containing 60 letters using the Boeing Model C700 to carry out a demonstration flight between Vancouver and Lake Union, Seattle. Boeing is the pilot while Hubbard wins the contract for a regular airmail service.
Photograph shows Hubbard (on the left) with Boeing

FMI: IFALPA

Fly Smart
Kent


03 Mar 09 Great Briefing Leaflet site on IFALPA

IFALPA has a great website where they offer up to date briefing leaflets on Accident Analysis and Prevention, Aerodrome and Ground Environment, Aircraft Design and Operations, Air Traffic Services, Dangerous Goods, Helicopters, Human Performance and Medical, Legal, and Security. One of the latest deals with the Effects of LASER Illumination on Aircraft.

FMI: IFALPA

Fly Smart,
Kent