29 Jan 10 Takeoff and Landing Accident Reduction Awareness and Education

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52F_RI.jpg
From the great folks at AOPA Air Safety Foundation: "You may get away with a lapse of judgment or an unpracticed skill in cruise flight, but landings are less forgiving. Add to that unfamiliar conditions—a soft or short runway, a gusty day, high density altitude, or a heavy airplane—and even high-time pilots can botch a landing. With an average of eight per week, bad landings are the most common type of general aviation accident. Learn from the mistakes of other pilots in this interactive map of landing accidents created by the AOPA Air Safety Foundation. Just mouse over an accident marker and then click on the accident number to read the NTSB’s narrative of the accident."
FMI: Aircraft Owners and Pilots Association
Editor: Maneuvering flight, VMC into IFR and takeoff/landing mishaps are the biggest killers in GA. These are good resources to review and to share with you flying buddies, provided free of charge by AOPA. A good risk assessment can prevent a lot of these kinds of mishaps, coupled with specific skills training that helps define where one's personal limits are. Sometimes the answer is to find another runway, wait for weather to improve or for it to cool off, make two trips instead of one, or simply go around and get stabilized for a second approach. Not to mention it is good to practice go arounds on a sunny, gusty day so we're ready for one on a rainy, foggy day. And everyone likes more flight time, right? :)
Fly Smart,
Kent

20 Jan 10 Helicopter Professional Pilots Safety Program

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Bell_Helicopter.jpg
Bell Helicopter, Textron Inc. safety publication, Helicopter Professional Pilots Safety Program or HELIPROPS, designed for helicopter pilots is now available electronically online. Bell’s newsletter Human AD Airworthiness for Humans is published quarterly in English and Spanish and is distributed to readers in approximately 121 countries. A popular feature of the newsletter are articles from helicopter pilot’s own experiences flying in “unusual situations;” all for the purpose of exchanging safety information, best practices, etc, pilot to pilot.

The web site, www.heliprops.com is a free resource for pilots, mechanics, owners - operators, students and enthusiasts. From the web site readers are able to download the Human AD newsletter, HELIPROPS Safety Posters and the “History of Helicopter Safety,” authored by Bell’s Chief of Flight Safety, Roy Fox. The FAAST program is committed to the reduction of helicopter accidents and encourages FAAST members as well as other airmen to review this valuable source of safety information.
For more information, please click on the links below:

LPD_USS_Duluth
HMLA-369 Bell UH-1N and AH-1W on USS Duluth 1989

HMLA-369 Bell UH-1N and AH-1W on USS Duluth 1989
English: http://www.bellhelicopter.com/ en/training/pdf/heliprops_21_ 2.pdf
Spanish: http://www.bellhelicopter.com/ en/training/pdf/heliprops_21_ 2_span.pdf

I have some good friends at Bell here in Alliance, TX. They do a good job providing training for aviation professionals and are outstanding supporters of the Wings program. Bell is now signed up as an Authorized Training Provider with the new Wings program, their courses can be found in faasafety.gov and on their website.
Fly Smart,
Kent



19 Jan 10 PSA CRJ-200 Runway Excursion Charleston, WV (EMAS Save)

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accident-PSA-CRJ200-CRW100119.jpg
from Aircrew Buzz
Late this afternoon, a PSA Airlines CRJ-200 aircraft overran a runway at Yeager Airport (CRW), Charleston, WV, following a rejected takeoff. The aircraft, operating as US Airways Express Flight JIA 2495, was departing on a scheduled passenger flight to Charlotte, NC, at the time of the incident. It came to a stop about 130 feet into the EMAS (Engineered Material Arresting System) area beyond the end of Runway 23 at CRW. No injuries have been reported among the three crew members and 30 passengers on board.

The incident occurred on January 19, 2010 at approximately 16:20 local time in Charleston. The reason for the rejected takeoff has not been reported.

WSAZ.com, reporting on a press conference held at Yeager Airport, quoted an official who said that there were "skid marks on the runway approximately 2,000 feet long." The good news is that the EMAS, which is 425 feet in length, obviously worked as intended. The aircraft reportedly stopped "about 125 feet from the edge of the mountain." The EMAS was installed at Yeager Airport in November of 2008.

By the way, @YeagerAirport did an exemplary job of live-tweeting information about the incident and its effects on the airport's operations in real time on Twitter. The photo above also was tweeted to the Yeager Airport Twitpic page.


14 Jan 10 Runway Safety Brief by Air France Brussels Sep 2009




Runway Safety Programs Presentation summary -


12 Jan 10 First Flight With Two-Way Radio

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Amelia.jpg
1935 -
Amelia Earhart (1897-1937) makes the first solo flight from Honolulu, Hawaii to Oakland, California. The flight, in a Lockheed Vega, takes 18 hours and 15 minutes and is credited as being the first flight where a civilian aircraft carried a two-way radio.
FMI: International Federation of Air Line Pilots' Associations


10 Jan 10 "Dirty Dozen" - 12 Challenges for Aviation Safety

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bigapt.jpg
Years ago an industry panel developed the "Dirty Dozen" list that identified hazards in aviation, focused on mishaps that were occurring in air carrier operations. Take a look at the list and see which ones we've made some progress towards eliminating through introduction of new technology, training and operational procedures. Then consider which ones are still basically uncontrolled. The areas where we still need a lot of work are highlighted in red.

1. Midair collision-TCAS
2. Inadequate terrain separation-Enhanced GPWS, use of minimum safe/vectoring altitudes
3. Unstabilized approach-? See # 5. SOPs, approach gates for configuration, airspeed, altitude. Visual and electronic glide paths. Wind and surface info.
4. Weather related damage or injury-? SOPs and personal mins for turbulence, icing, convective activity
5. Runway excursions-? See # 3.
6. Abort before 100 knots-SOP
7. Significant operational deviation-SOPs and personal minimums, CRM.
8. Runway Incursion-ASDE-X at a few airports, but what about widely used cockpit technologies?
9. Landing on wrong runway/airport-Precision nav (FMS). Approach brief. Backup with instrument approach procedure. Landing clearances.
10. Altitude deviation-Readback hearback. CRM. Use of autopilot as additional crew.
11. Navigation deviation-Use of precision nav sources, GPS, FMS.
12. Ground injury or damage-? Slow down and be familiar with airport surface ops.

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Runway Incursion - GA vs Air Carrier

Runway Incursion - GA vs Air Carrier
We need to get a lot smarter and technologically advanced with regards to surface operations, because hazards will exponentialy compound as the number of operations increases. In some ways we are more exposed to hazards on the ground, because flight planning and ops support may not focus as much on these phases of "flight". We need to be very familiar with the winds, surface conditions, runway lengths, geometry and facility layouts, airport lighting and approach systems. We also need to be aware that the priority guidance to "Aviate, Navigate and Communicate" is essentially reversed when we are on the ground. The focus on the ground is to "Communicate", to listen and build a mental model of where other aircraft and vehicles are. Keep in mind that vision is our primary sensory input, and now we are asking the brain to shift priority to listening. The next priority is to "Navigate", we must know at a minimum where we are, in order to get to where we want to be. Charts and electronic moving maps assist in this area, but the key is to "Look outside". Lastly, it is harder to "Aviate" on the ground, we are not "aircraft" in this regime but rather ground vehicles with limited visibility, reduced maneuverability and many of our warning systems have little or no functionality on the ground. Couple this with the fact that the areas we are maneuvering in are confined and many times unfamiliar, and the fact that the runways are areas where there is great potential for a high energy collision, then we certainly have challenges to manage.

What can be done to improve the system? The first step is to study the operational environment, and the next step is to identify hazards, so that we can avoid them and implement programs to eliminate them. One good way to do this is to put in a report via NASA ASRS, because folks who manage airspace systems need this information to improve the system. Another good investment is to participate in the Wings program, and dedicate ourselves to lifelong learning in our chosen craft. The best way we will learn is from each other.

Fly Smart,
Kent


07 Jan 10 Preventing Wrong Runway Departures

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KCLE_APD_AIRPORT_DIAGRAM.png
The Commercial Air Safety Team and FAA developed an excellent brochure on Wrong Runway Departures. One finding of the team was 8 major factors that can increase the risk of a wrong runway departure:
1) Short taxi distance, 2) Airport complexity, 3) A single taxiway leading to multiple runway thresholds, 4) Close physical proximity of multiple runway thresholds, 5) More than two taxiways intersecting in one area, 6) A short runway (less than 5,000 feet), 7) Joint use of a runway as a taxiway, and 8) Single runway airports.

This brochure is designed to share best practices that you can use to ensure you won’t unintentionally be caught in your own WRONG RUNWAY DEPARTURE! Using these best practices will help guarantee a safe flight, every flight.

external image pdf.png Preventing Wrong Runway Departures.pdf
Fly Smart,
Kent


06 Jan 10 Runway Safety Areas

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Andrew P. Smith/Reuters

Andrew P. Smith/Reuters
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
A runway safety area (RSA) or runway end safety area (RESA) is defined as "the surface surrounding the runway prepared or suitable for reducing the risk of damage to airplanes in the event of an undershoot, overshoot, or excursion from the runway."[1]
Past standards called for the RSA to extend only 60m (200 feet) from the ends of the runway. Currently the international standard ICAO requires a 90m (300 feet) RESA starting from the end of the runway strip (which itself is 60m from the end of the runway), and recommends but not requires a 240m RESA beyond that. In the U.S., the recommended RSA may extend to 500 feet in width, and 1,000 feet beyond each runway end (according to U.S. Federal Aviation Administration recommendations; 1000 feet is equivalent to the international ICAO-RESA of 240m plus 60m strip). The standard dimensions have increased over time to accommodate larger and faster aircraft, and to improve safety.

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AP/Helen H. Richardson,The Denver Post

AP/Helen H. Richardson,The Denver Post

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KUSA-TV

KUSA-TV
FMI: Runway Safety Area
Risk assessment is key. Are all of the airplane systems operating correctly? Is the crew well rested? Is wind a factor? What is the surface condition of the runway, is there ice, snow, standing water or contamination from rubber deposits? Are there visual and electronic systems turned on and in use to assist in establishment of stabilized approach criteria, both at the airport and on the flight deck? Was the airplane certified in these conditions, and crews properly trained and experienced?
It is easy enough to sit here and ask these questions when it is clear and sunny outside, with all of the time in the world to ponder the answers, but it is another to consider the questions while covering the ground at 2 and a half miles per minute when weather, airport systems and fuel are factors. Human nature is to pick scenarios from memory that we are familiar with, and most of us are familiar with millions of flights that are safely completed to airports where there is snow, rain, short runways and challenging weather.

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Dyersburg State Gazette

Dyersburg State Gazette


One of the top problems in the general aviation community are accidents during the takeoff and landing phases of flight, when the airplane is in transition between an air vehicle or a ground vehicle. Most of the same factors listed above are found during investigation of these mishaps, so knowing the threats and creating a plan to manage them is critical. AOPA and the Flight Safety Foundation have valuable resources available to help in this regard.

Fly Smart,
Kent





Happy New Year 2010

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Tri-Motor_Prop.JPG
Here's wishing you a safe and prosperous New Year. Take some time this year to learn more about our craft by visiting AOPA, the Flight Safety Foundation and FAA Safety.gov. There is some great info there that helps us fly smart and have fun. And if you're into resolutions, how about resolving to introduce a flying friend to one of these resources this year. Getting a new pilot signed up for Wings Seminars or an AOPA membership would be a great, long lasting gift.

Happy Trails,
Kent