19 Dec 09 FAA Runway Safety Brief by James White: Nov 2009 Update

Take a few minutes and look through the excellent presentation on runways safety presented to RASG – Pan America Meeting by James White, Deputy Director, Airport Safety and Standards, FAA. It is an great update on ongoing initiatives to make operations on and around our runways safer. There are some really eye opening FOD pictures, as well as pictures of new runway technologies (RWSL, THL, REL), avian radar and CFR improvements.

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Eagle_on_runway.jpg
Here is one of the items detected by a FOD camera.
external image pdf.png runway safety rasg bogota.pdf



Fly Smart, and remember to fly neighborly,
Kent











19 Dec 09 NBAA Announces New Professional Development Program Courses


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Falcon.jpg
The National Business Aviation Association (NBAA) today announced the approval of six new Professional Development Program (PDP) Courses offered by five different PDP providers. NBAA also seeks new educational providers to develop additional courses.
The new offerings listed below are described by course number, title and PDP objective.
  • Aviation Training Solutions has two new courses approved that are each available in a one day class format with a flexible schedule. The first course is called Effective Leadership in Business Aviation and it meets PDP objective L3. This course explains the qualities of good leadership and hope to motivate and achieve results within a flight department. The second course called Enhancing Productivity through Business Aviation meets objective BM1 and relates the various transportation solutions and how they can be incorporated into the corporate culture of the business aviation flight department.
  • Aviem International, Inc. offers the approved course, "Emergency Planning for Business Aviation" that includes developing and implementing a disaster recovery plan for the business aviation flight department (Ops5).
  • Convergent Performance LLC was approved for a course titled "Pilot Reliability Certification" that covers basic human factors in business aviation (PM9).
  • Ohio University has an approved course called "Business in Aviation" that plans for corporate travel analysis and the concepts of fitting the flight department into a corporate culture (BM1).
  • Sinclair Community College, has "Principles of Aviation Leadership (AVT-141)" that outlines the methods for developing a strategic mission and vision statement for the flight department. (L1, L2).
NBAA's Professional Development Program provides a curriculum for the education of current and future business aviation managers. The program encourages participation in coursework, recognizes outstanding candidates and participants, and rewards those seeking careers in business aviation.
PDP Courses also are a means of preparing individuals to become NBAA Certified Aviation Managers (CAMs), though participation in PDP is not required for participation in the CAM Program.
NBAA seeks providers for additional PDP Courses. Traditionally, established training organizations and educational institutions provide PDP Courses through a variety of convenient and flexible delivery methods, including Internet courses, video instructions and on-site seminars. Individuals and organizations interested in becoming PDP-approved providers should contact NBAA. The deadline for provider and course submissions is January 15, 2010; NBAA's PDP Review Committee will make selections in spring, 2010.
FMI: www.nbaa.org/pdp, Aero-News Network

Editor's note: It would be good to see programs developed for managers that discuss safety programs, risk management, assurance, policy, reporting, investigation and safety information systems. Future business aviation managers should be well versed in these areas.

Fly Smart,
Kent


18 Dec 09 Omniflight Helicopters Teams Up With FlightSafety International

From Aero-News Network: Simulation Training And Education To Be Offered In Tucson

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external image flightsafetylogo0302a_tn.gif
Omniflight Helicopters announced Monday that it has entered into an agreement with FlightSafety International. The agreement provides Omniflight the opportunity to train its aviation professionals using FlightSafety’s new AS350 simulator, a Level 7 flight training device that basically serves as a replica of the aircraft. The training will take place at FlightSafety’s educational center in Tucson, AZ, where Omniflight’s instructors will lead and conduct the process.
Beginning in early 2010, nearly 200 pilots nationwide will be trained using FlightSafety’s AS350 simulator. This includes training for newly hired as well as current Omniflight pilots and will focus on both regulatory and mission-specific, scenario-based training.
Conducting training in the simulator will allow Omniflight to provide instruction on certain specific maneuvers that can be performed more effectively in the device. In particular, Omniflight expects to see increased effectiveness in training for encounters associated with Inadvertent Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IIMC) and a wide range of emergency procedures.
“The FlightSafety training program will allow us to capitalize on the proven benefits of simulator training processes, which include enhanced safety and heightened performance,” said Eric Pangburn, chief rotor-wing pilot at Omniflight who will head the program for the company.
“The training will offer a decreased chance of physical risk and improved cost efficiencies since it will be conducted on the ground, which ultimately results in increased aircraft availability. It also affords us more flexibility and enhanced productivity in the type of training options it is capable of performing,” Pangburn explained.
external image Omniflight-AS350-0509a_tn.jpg
external image Omniflight-AS350-0509a_tn.jpg

Omniflight AS350

Anthony J. DiNota, president and chief operating officer, added: “We have long seen the successes and benefits of flight simulation training when used at major airlines and within other segments of the aerospace industry. Now, the time has finally come when this type of high-level commercial simulator training is available for the AS350. It is truly exciting to have an opportunity to be among the first entities to conduct training with this new simulator, which has been specifically designed for helicopters that operate within the air medical transport arena.
“With this arrangement with FlightSafety, Omniflight is improving the quality of its pilots while helping them to excel in their abilities to appropriately respond to patient needs during the course of duty," DiNota said. "We are delighted to be leading the charge within the air medical services sector and look forward to continuing to capitalize on additional simulator training opportunities as progression continues in the marketplace."
FMI: www.omniflight.com

Smart move,
Kent


17 Dec 09 Best of 2009: HEMS Industry Risk Profile

I am writing a paper on Risk Management and I remembered the HEMS Industry Risk Profile that was published early this year, and thought it was one of the best documents posted this year. It would make a good document to review over the holidays and implement in the New Year. Happy Holidays!

20 Apr 09 HEMS Industry Risk Profile

PHI
PHI

PHI
From the Flight Safety Foundation: "The Flight Safety Foundation released a groundbreaking assessment today that provides a comprehensive look at the risks facing the Helicopter Emergency medical services (HEMS) industry. The Industry Risk Profile (IRP), developed by Aerosafe Risk Management, also provides a roadmap outlining proactive steps that the industry and regulators can follow in order to mitigate these risks.

Careflite
Careflite

Careflite
Aerosafe developed the IRP using internationally recognized risk management standards. This independent analysis utilized a wide variety of data and perspectives from the HEMS industry. The IRP process is designed specifically to allow industry to step up and shape a way forward. A copy of the HEMS IRP is available on the Flight Safety Foundation web site at
www.flightsafety.org/pdf/HEMS_Industry_Risk_profile.pdf

This is a great collaborative product, and free! I also uploaded a copy external image pdf.png HEMS_Industry_Risk_Profile.pdf.

Fly Smart

Kent


09 Dec 09 Taxiing Toward Tomorrow: Runway Safety Summit Highlights Need for Collaboration

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From NTSB Chairman Deborah Hersman’s opening remarks, to FAA Director of Runway Safety Wes Timmons’ closing statement and recap of accomplishments, the consensus was clear at last week’s first FAA International Runway Safety Summit: Focus, cooperation, and teamwork are the key components to improving airport surface operations worldwide. To see evidence of this need for global collaboration one only had to look as far as the roster, which included nearly 500 attendees from 17 different nations.

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WesTimmons.jpg
Many of the topics presented and discussed by safety experts and key industry stakeholders directly involved general aviation, including airport layouts, cockpit and ATC procedures, human factors, and technology. Also discussed were ongoing initiatives, as well as plans for future runway safety improvements in the U.S. and around the world. Presentations from many of the event’s speakers and panelists will be available in two weeks at http://events.aaae.org/sites/ 091107/.
FMI: Runway Safety
Fly Smart,
Kent


04 Dec 09 AOPA Offers Great Tips To Improve Runway Safety

December 3, 2009 by Bruce Landsberg
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Approach_Lights
Runway safety – a continuing saga? Yes, and so it should be. Some may be tired of hearing about it but the facts are that from 2003 through 2008 there were between 24 and 32 Category A or B incursions annually. A & Bs are the bad ones where either exceptional skill, some luck or likely a bit of both prevented a catastrophe.
It was my privilege to represent GA and to speak at the FAA’s International Runway Safety Conference in DC this week along with two NTSB members, The airlines, airport operators air traffic controllers – in short anyone who had anything to do with keeping aircraft and vehicles from getting together on runways was there.
Many things were discussed but here’s what should be of interest to pilots:
1. Moving map displays are a nice addition to any cockpit to help you reference location but remember to look outside.
2. If there’s even the slightest bit of uncertainty, verify with the tower that you are cleared to cross or enter a runway.
3. ALWAYS look even though you’ve been cleared to cross, takeoff or land – it’s saved me several times.
3. Distraction is deadly – avoid multi-tasking and don’t be programing the magic while the aircraft is moving unless there’s another pilot on board and one of you is looking outside.
4. Complacency is deadly – think it can’t happen to you ? Ask anyone of the roughly 900 pilots who had a deviation last year. They have a different opinion – now.
The good news is that for 2009 the A’s and B’s are down to about 12 but it’s too soon to tell if that’s due to reduced flight hours or that we’re starting to get a handle on this.
If you have a runway safety suggestion, share it even for non-towered airports. It was only last week we were discussing traffic patterns there and check out the new runway safety course that FAA Office of Runway Safety was kind enough to sponsor. I guarantee you’ll learn something even if you’ve taken our earlier version. I did. If you’ve got a practical test or a flight review soon this is strongly recommended – chances are excellent inquiring minds will want to know.
Check out these additional ASF resources on Runway Safety:
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Allentown.jpg



04 Dec 09 ALPA to FAA: Fatigue Rule Needed Now

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From Aero-News: In testimony before a U.S. Senate subcommittee on Tuesday, Capt. John Prater, president of the Air Line Pilots Association, Int’l, (ALPA), told senators that current federal flight- and duty-time rules for airline pilots are obsolete and modern science-based regulations are needed now to combat pilot fatigue and safeguard passengers and cargo.
“We are disappointed by the FAA’s announcement that the draft regulation will be delayed until early next year, but we expect work to remain on track to create a new regulation by mid-2010,” said Prater after his testimony before the Aviation Operations, Safety, and Security Subcommittee of the U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation. “The threat from pilot fatigue is dire, and the decisive action our industry needs from the FAA can’t come quickly enough.”
The existing rules date from the 1950s and are “a stick-and-wire biplane struggling to stay aloft in a supersonic age,” Prater said in his testimony to the members of the Senate. “I ask for your help in giving the flying public a new, consistent level of safety by ensuring that every pilot in the United States starts every trip alert and rested.”
Prater said the new rule on pilot fatigue must meet three criteria to be truly effective: it must be based on scientific research into human fatigue and circadian rhythms, it should be uniform for all airline pilots, and it should encourage airline managers and pilot unions to collaborate in setting up voluntary Fatigue Risk Management Systems (FRMS) at their individual carriers.
“No science exists to support multiple sets of flight-time and duty-time limits. No rational argument can be made for different flight/duty rules for pilots based on whether they fly passengers or cargo, domestic or international,” he said. Prater pointed to existing rules that allow cargo pilots to fly up to 60 percent more hours in a given week than pilots carrying passengers within the United States. “Exceptions or ‘carve-outs’ would kill long-overdue efforts to ensure all pilots are well rested. Worse, carve-outs would undermine the one-level-of-safety principle that must remain our ultimate goal.”
Seven ALPA pilots representing every spectrum of the airline industry participated in an Aviation Rulemaking Committee (ARC) that made recommendations to the FAA. FAA Administrator Randy Babbitt had publicly stated that his agency would publish a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) on this vital aviation safety issue by the end of 2009, and issue a final rule next year.
“I remain encouraged that we finally appear to be on the verge of securing the modern, science-based flight- and duty-time rules we know are so vital to enhancing aviation safety,” concluded Prater. “We look forward to evaluating the FAA’s proposed rule, and challenge the administration to stay on target for a final rule by mid-2010.”
FMI: aero-news, www.alpa.org,

Fly Smart...and awake,
Kent