Dec 23, 2010 Santa Inbound!


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NORAD.jpg
For more than 50 years, NORAD and its predecessor, the Continental Air Defense Command (CONAD) have tracked Santa’s flight.
The tradition began in 1955 after a Colorado Springs-based Sears Roebuck & Co. advertisement for children to call Santa misprinted the telephone number. Instead of reaching Santa, the phone number put kids through to the CONAD Commander-in-Chief’s operations "hotline." The Director of Operations at the time, Colonel Harry Shoup, had his staff check the radar for indications of Santa making his way south from the North Pole. Children who called were given updates on his location, and a tradition was born.
In 1958, the governments of Canada and the United States created a bi-national air defense command for North America called the North American Aerospace Defense Command, also known as NORAD, which then took on the tradition of tracking Santa.
Since that time, NORAD men, women, family and friends have selflessly volunteered their time to personally respond to phone calls and emails from children all around the world. In addition, we now track Santa using the internet. Millions of people who want to know Santa’s whereabouts now visit the NORAD Tracks Santa website.
Finally, media from all over the world rely on NORAD as a trusted source to provide updates on Santa’s journey.

FMI: NORAD Santa

Editor: Just a reminder, Santa's sleigh has a wake turrbulence category of "supra" heavy, so plan on 10 miles in trail. He also has a waiver from the FAA for "lights out" operations and to exceed 250 knots below 10,000 feet, so comply with all TCAS RAs immediately. Pilots should also be aware that these cargo operations are conducted under SARSA (Santa Assumes responsibility for Separation of Aircraft) regulations. Lastly, FBOs should remember that the reindeer prefer warm oats during the fuel stops as an anti-icing preventative.

Season's Greetings!

Clark


18 Dec 10 Small Suburb Airports, A CAFE Concept and Green Flight Challenge

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What if every suburb had a small airport? The basic single-runway pocket airports would be no larger than two acres (0.8 hectares) in size, and located in greenbelts just outside major urban areas. They would be capable of 120 operations per hour, as rows of Suburban Air Vehicles (SAV)/air taxis would wait for their turn to take off, one going every 30 seconds. Comparative Aircraft Flight Efficiency (CAFE) Challenge also has designs for a 4-acre (1.6-hectare) airport that would have three runways arranged in a triangle, that would be capable of 260 operations per hour, plus an 8-acre (3.2-hectare) version with two end-to-end runways (with a large space in between them), and a 12-acre (4.8-hectare) version with two sets of the end-to-end runways and parking for 320 ground vehicles.

FMI: CAFE, Geeko System
Fly Smart,
Kent


17 Dec 10 University of North Texas Aviation Logistics Program Graduates First Students ||
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image: Univ of North Texas
|| || image: Univ of North Texas ||

Private pilot Laura Rusnok will be the first graduate of the aviation-logistics program at the University of North Texas. Rusnok earned her pilot's license at the U.S. Flight Academy at Denton Airport in Denton, Texas. "I'm excited to be done with school," Rusnok said.
Laura Rusnok, who said she’s known she wanted to be a pilot since she was 16 and received a flight demonstration for her birthday, will be the first UNT student to earn a degree in aviation logistics, a course of study introduced at the university in fall 2009.


FMI: Denton Record-Chronicle, AOPA Smart Brief

Editor: Learn more about UNT's Aviation Logistics program and U.S. Flight Academy. These are good programs to combine if you are interested in aviation, in a nice part of the country to learn to fly.

Fly Smart,
Clark



16 Dec 10 Ninety-Nines Receive $10,000 Grant from Lightspeed Aviation Foundation

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The women pilots association The Ninety-Nines has received a grant of $10,000 from the Lightspeed Aviation Foundation. Founded and chaired by Lightspeed Aviation Corp. president Allan Schrader, the Foundation's grant program aims to help increase recognition and funding opportunities for aviation-related charitable organizations.
The Ninety-Nines, founded in 1929, has an 81-year history of providing scholarships, conducting aviation education programs and safety seminars, and maintaining historical records of women's contributions to aviation. In keeping with one of the goals of the original 99 members, to assist women pilots in advancing their aviation careers, the organization also sponsors a successful mentoring program for professional women pilots and an online flight training forum for women either just beginning or continuing their flight training. The Ninety-Nines is based at Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City where it operates The 99s Museum of Women Pilots. It also owns and operates the Amelia Earhart Birthplace Museum in Atchison, KS. Membership is open to any woman with at least a student pilot certificate.
FMI: www.ninety-nines.org

Bravo Zulu to Lightspeed for supporting this great organization!
Kent


13 Dec 10 Chuckie Airborne Again ||
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image credit: VFM (TBD)
|| || image credit: VFM (TBD) ||

The B-17 Chuckie flew again last Thursday and Friday in support of the DFW Expo. Lots of schoolkids and adults got to see one of America's great airplanes, put back into the air again by the great volunteer group at the Vintage Flying Museum. More info on Chuckie's next great adventure and pics to follow.

FMI: Vintage Flying Museum
Fly Smart,
Kent
VFM Supporter





8 Dec 10 Greyhound Adoption League of Texas Gala, Frontiers Of Flight Museum, Dallas, TX Feb 26, 2011

Spend an evening with the fastest dogs and one of the fastest men on the planet as you participate in a critical mission: Operation Forever Home. Put on your aviator sunglasses, leather bomber jacket, flight suit, or military memorabilia and head over to the Frontiers of Flight Museum at Dallas Love field for GALT’s 10th annual Greyt Gala. In addition to our usual celebrity guests, this year GALT welcomes SR-71 Spy Plane Pilot Colonel (ret) Rich Graham. During dinner Colonel Graham will talk about his experiences flying America’s most secret aircraft at over three times the speed of sound, at 70,000 feet, and directly above some of the most dangerous spots in the world. There will also be a dinner and a silent auction.
external image pdf.png [[../../file/view/Forever+Home+Flyer.pdf|Forever Home Flyer.pdf]]
Editor: Check out the Museum and support a good cause (and wear your flight jacket...)
Kent



6 Dec 10 Special Emphasis: Collision Avoidance

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NTSB Identification: WPR11LA068A; Accident occurred Wednesday, December 01, 2010 in Madras, OR.
On December 1, 2010, about 1130 Pacific standard time, the propeller of a Taylorcraft BC-65, N23619, and the aft portion of the empennage of a Cessna 185A, N1699Z, came in contact with each other while both aircraft were on visual flight rules (VFR) final approach to Madras Airport, Madras, Oregon. The certified flight instructor (CFI) and in his student in the Taylorcraft, which was not radio equipped, were not injured, but the airplane, which is owned and operated by Berg Air, sustained substantial damage. The airline transport pilot and his passenger in the Cessna were also uninjured, but the Cessna, which was owned and operated by the passenger, also sustained substantial damage. The occupants of the Taylorcraft were on a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 local instructional flight, and the occupants of the Cessna were on a 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 91 personal pleasure flight. The pilot of the Cessna was on his second circuit of the VFR pattern, and the occupants of the Taylorcraft were on their first of a planned multiple circuits of the VFR pattern after returning from a training flight in the local area. Neither aircraft was on a flight plan.

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Madras.jpg
According to the occupants of the Taylorcraft, they did not see the Cessna until they were on short final, whereupon the empennage of the Cessna suddenly appeared underneath and very close to the left wing of their airplane. The CFI, who was flying at the time, immediately tried to bank to the right, but the propeller of the Taylorcraft came in contact with the Cessna before he could gain separation. After impacting the Cessna, the Taylorcraft's propeller stopped turning, and therefore the CFI made a power-off landing on the extended 1,800-foot paved stop-way of the old military runway.

According to the pilot of the Cessna, neither occupant ever saw the Taylorcraft, but while on short final they heard a loud bang come from the aft end of their airplane. Immediately after they heard the bang, the airplane pitched down and rolled to the right, but the pilot was able to regain control and continue flying straight ahead. Because the occupants were unaware that their airplane had come in contact with another airplane, and because they thought they had either impacted a large bird or experienced some sort of mechanical failure, they elected to climb straight ahead and land at their home airport, which was about 10 minutes away. It was not until after landing at their home airport and inspecting the airplane that the occupants of the Cessna realized there had been a mid-air collision.

At the time of the accident, there were scattered clouds about 3,000 feet above ground level (AGL) and a visibility of more than 10 miles.

Editor: Collision Avoidance is a special emphasis area for the FAA. FMI check out the resources and information on our wikipage.

Fly Smart,
Kent


5 DEC 10 Runway Excursions and Incursions: Hindsight Article

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Bert Ruitenberg has authored a thought provoking article on the differences and similarities between runway excursions and runway incursions. Efforts to reduce will require a multidisciplinary approach from all corners of the airspace system, beginning with creation of a standardized safety database vocabulary. The article was published by EUROCONTROL in Hindsight magazine and can be downloaded here.

Editor: Mr. Ruitenberg mentions the repeated appearance of wind and precipitation as factors in many runway excursions, and this is definitely the season for that. Computations of takeoff and landing distances, abort criteria, stabilized approaches and timely, accurate weather information are critical elements of safe takeoff and landing operations. The Flight Safety Foundation offers excellent Runway Excursion Risk Reduction and Runway Safety Initiative toolkits on their website. Also the outstanding free magazine Aerosafety World.

Fly Smart,
Kent